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Poaching

A cooking technique in which items are gently cooked in a liquid, between the temperatures of 160°F and 185°F. When poaching make sure the food is completely submerged, in the heated liquid. This technique produces foods that are extremely moist with distinct flavors, delicate colors and no crust. For fish or shellfish use a flavorful liquid such as fish stock, fumet, wine or court bouillon and aromatic herbs and spices.
Steps for poaching:
  1. Heat liquid to a full boil, than reduce heat slightly (between 160°F and 185°F)
  2. Carefully add food to the liquid and return to correct temperature (adding the food to the liquid will reduce the temperature of the poaching liquid)
  3. Maintain the temperature of the liquid, skimming the top as necessary (careful not to boil the liquid as the food may begin to break up)
  4. Cook food until properly done, then carefully remove food from the liquid (to stop the cooking process remove food from the liquid and place on a cooling rack, careful not make food fall apart)
  5. Evaluate food and serve

Careful not to confuse with Shallow-Poaching, where the food is not completely submerged. The food is covered halfway by liquid and the top is cooked by steam. Shallow-poaching is normally done with a cartouche (a parchment paper lid), to trap in the steam and cook evenly.

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½ C Smoked Paprika
¼ C Cayenne Pepper
¼ C Onion Powder
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2 Tbsp White Pepper
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1 Tbsp Dark Chili Powder
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1 tsp Ground Bay Leaves
1 tsp Filé Powder
½ tsp Ground Cloves
1 tsp Ground Thyme
½ tsp dried Rosemary
½ tsp Ground Ginger
½ tsp Cumin Powder
¼ tsp Ground Allspice Combine all ingredients, mix well and store in a tightly sealed glass jar to hold freshness. Stay fresh for up to 4 months.