Cheftionary

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Studying different culinary terms, learning and practicing recipes all the time. I am very passionate about food and family. I cook at work and at home.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Different Types of Stock

A stock is a very flavorsome liquid made by simmering animal carcass and/or vegetables in water and aromatics until their flavor is extracted. Usually used as a base for soups, sauces, braising liquids and several other culinary preparations.
There are several different types of stock, here are a few of them I use.
*Simple stock- combine flavoring ingredients with water and simmer for a specific amount of time (cooking times may very according to the type of stock your making). Chicken stock, vegetable stock and fish stock are examples of simple stocks. They are normally used to prepare soups, grains and vegetables. Skim often.
*White stock- a neutral flavored stock made by blanching the bones in water before marrying them with water, vegetables and herbs. The most common whites stocks are made from beef or veal. White stocks are great for adding body to certain dishes without changing the flavor much.
*Seafood stock- made from shrimp and lobster shells, some fish heads or bones. The remainder of the ingredients may include different types of vegetables, herbs and cold water.
*Brown stock- cook on stove top or roast bones and vegetables until deep in color before adding cold water and aromatics. For more flavor and color you may add tomato paste to the bones before roasting and/or you may add a oignon brûlé (burnt onion) for additional flavor and color.
*Fumet- a white stock typically made of lean, white flat fish bones, such as flounder or sole. Cooked gently with vegetable aromatics typically a white mirepoix (onions, celery, parsnips, leeks and mushrooms). For added flavor you may also add a small amount of white wine after the vegetables have been cooked. Cover the pot in order to capture as much flavor as possible, creating a liquid that is not normally as clear as other stocks.

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Stock Preparation

Gathering and making sure you have the right equipment and ingredients (mise en place) is very important when making a good stock. The size and shape of the pot used to cook the stock plays a major role in assuring that your stock is rich in flavor, full-bodied and have a great color. The stockpot used should hold all of the ingredients and the liquids and still have at least 3 inches of space left over at the top of the pot. Stockpots are always taller than they are wide because the shape helps to create a good stock. The smaller suface area helps to better extract the flavors from the ingredients and it encourages convection by bringing all of the impurities to the top of the stock to be skimmed away more easily.
The best selection of the ingredients determines if you are going to have rich flavorful, full-bodied stock or not. There is nothing like having a delicious stock to flavor soups, stews and sauces.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Liaison

A thickening agent for soups and sauces including a mixture of egg yolks and cream, beurre manie and slurries. If tempered correctly, it should give the dish more body and a smooth tight texture.
Basic ratio: 3 parts cream and 1 part egg yolk.